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2021 Honda Talon 1000R
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm wondering if anyone else is having an issue where the rear CV boot keeps slipping off of the axle housing? To make note, I'm on a brand new set of Rhino 2.0 axles, and the right rear axle has been replaced twice from the mfg. It's appearing to me as if the diff is getting very hot, and thus causing the grease in there to liquefy and push out under the boot and seal. I noticed this on the OEM axles, and just figured they were junk. That's why they were replaced with the Rhino 2.0's. I would actually see grease spurts on the OEM axles shooting out from underneath the boot. On these Rhino's the whole dam boot comes off! Getting sick of this. And it just started out of nowhere, like out the blue. I've even changed the rear diff oil thinking that it was low and getting hot. Happened to the first Rhino axle at about 30 miles, this is the brand new replacement of a brand new axle and I cant even get 5 miles before the damn thing comes off.
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I can tell you the diff gets really hot! Just curious if anyone else has seen this issue.
 

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2021 Honda Talon 1000R
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't see a clamp, did you remove it? I can see an impression where a clamp used to be though.
Thanks for that, it's on the axle still, it's slipped down and is out of the pic, but yea. In this case, I don't have a proper clamp, so I've been using a worm gear clamp that might be used in plumbing. I'm sure you know what I mean. Doesn't matter how hard I crank it down, ultimately the boot slips off.
 

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Suggestion, use a good cleaner/grease remover, get all the grease off the axle and inside the lip of the boot that touches the axle. I use brake or carb cleaner sprayed on a rag. DO NOT spray is directly on the axle or boot, wipe clean and let dry thoroughly befor putting back on and putting the clamp. Make sure not to over tighten the clamp it will crimp or cut the boot.
 

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Also don't extend the boot any farther than the none painted surface, the grooves on the raw part of the axle should line up with the grooves on the boot where the clamp was.
 

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The picture looks like boot was pushed on half way on the painted area by clean line on black area. I have a boot installed with a worm gear hose clamp also that is holding good.
 

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2021 Honda Talon 1000R
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I figured I'd respond since it's been a while. I appreciate your responses. Ultimately I became disgusted in dealing with the continual nonsense with the CV boot coming off on these Rino's, and swapped in the OEM axles. Since then, I've logged about 800-1000 miles on the stock axles. I have about 2600 miles on my Talon now and only 120 of that was on those Rhino axles. I guess that would give you some indications as to the quality of the Rhinos vs the OEM's.

That said my vehicle does sit a bit higher all together due to the after-market (Eibach) springs, and the rear axles are not flat, but rather raked and angled. Where the OEM's seem to tolerate that rake and angle, the Rhino's did not, well at least as far as the CV boot was concerned.

I will point out that my OEM axles are now clicking when cold on some days. Since these are CV axles, I equate this to being a kid in the 80's learning to drive and a few of my first, well-worn, front-wheel drive vehicles with long worn-out CV joints in the front when they'd click on sharp turns and whatnot. However I don't care, I'll just either rebuild the OEM's or buy new OEM Axles when the time is right. For now, the Rhino's are in the box and are for sale if you really want them.

One final follow-up to this, the reason I went to Rhino's was that the OEM axle (again, right side) at the top diff had squired out a little grease while riding one day. It had me concerned, I later learned from a fellow Talon rider, and long-time Honda "nut" that those bands sometimes come from the factory not fully or completely cinched. I have a pinching tool, but so far have been too lazy to just address the cinches for some reason. Recently, I noticed (right side) that the bottom end of that axle, at the wheel hub, decided to throw a bit of grease somehow under the seal, it caked up a small amount around the hub, I just left it and continued to ride... Hey, I was almost 100 miles from home, screw it. Thus far it's still working great and is not throwing anymore grease... Maybe it's all gone? Don't care. I'm going to continue to ride with these until it's time to huck them in the hopper and rebuild or replace them depending on the state they are in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So it turns out that the springs (by a UTV) shop were installed entirely wrong, the rear was sitting up way too high, and the front was not high enough. Thanks to HondaBob for pointing that out, so I'm working on fixing that entire mess, again thanks to HondaBob for getting me started. The springs were not installed in the right positions on all 4 corners. Likely the Rhinos were not happy at the extreme angle my rear was sitting, I'll likely give them another try after if fix the boot and the OEM's are at the point where they are beaten. Effectively I paid someone with a shop to install the springs properly for me, and I guess in the end it turns out that they didn't which the old adage "if you want something done right, you gotta do it yourself" still applies. Getting too old, lazy, and uninterested in dicking around with major work, but I'm determined to make the suspension right, at the right ride height.
 

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So it turns out that the springs (by a UTV) shop were installed entirely wrong, the rear was sitting up way too high, and the front was not high enough. Thanks to HondaBob for pointing that out, so I'm working on fixing that entire mess, again thanks to HondaBob for getting me started. The springs were not installed in the right positions on all 4 corners. Likely the Rhinos were not happy at the extreme angle my rear was sitting, I'll likely give them another try after if fix the boot and the OEM's are at the point where they are beaten. Effectively I paid someone with a shop to install the springs properly for me, and I guess in the end it turns out that they didn't which the old adage "if you want something done right, you gotta do it yourself" still applies. Getting too old, lazy, and uninterested in dicking around with major work, but I'm determined to make the suspension right, at the right ride height.
Glad you got it figured out! ;) That was what my question was pointing to with wanting to see a picture of the rear end!)
 
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